E-Issue 07 –– AUH
Winter 2023-24

January 29th, 2024



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in Abu Dhabi/Dubai
  3. Cover Interview: Shaikha Al Ketbi on Darawan
  4. Rapport: Public Art in the Gulf and a Case Study of Manar Abu Dhabi
  5. Hashel Al Lamki’s Survey Exhibition Maqam Reflects on a Decade of Practice in Abu Dhabi
  6. “You Can’t Stand on a Movement”: Michelangelo Pistoletto Interviews Benton Interviewing Pistoletto

E-07++
Winter/Spring 2024


Curators Interview May 14, 2024
AUH Embracing Change through an Open System: Maya Allison and Duygu Demir on “In Real Time” at NYUAD Art Gallery



About ––

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    Contributors
    Contact

Interviews ––

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Open Call ––

    Policy
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Newsletter ––




Chronological Archive ––

    Selected Archive

Artist Interview November 18th, 2016
AUH Raed Yassin in Abu Dhabi

Editorial March 1st, 2018
AUH Abu Dhabi Is The New Calabasas

Exhibition Listing May 22nd, 2018
DXB Christopher Benton: If We Don't Reclaim Our History, The Sand Will

Artist Interview June 15th, 2018
TYO An Interview with BIEN, a Rising Japanese Artist

Artist Interview July 17th, 2018
TYO Rintaro Fuse on Selfies and Cave Painting

Artist Interview August 28th, 2018
BER Slavs and Tatars: “Pulling a Thread to Undo The Sweater”

Artist Interview September 1st, 2018
NYC Shirin Neshat In Conversation with Sophie Arni and Ev Zverev

Artist Interview September 1st, 2018
PAR Hottest Spices: Michèle Lamy

E-Issue 01 –– AUH/DXB
Summer 2020

August 1st, 2020



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in the UAE
  3. Pop(Corn): Hashel Al Lamki
  4. Tailoring in Abu Dhabi
  5. Rapport: Dubai
  6. Michael Rakowitz From the Diaspora


E-01++
Fall/Winter 2020-21


Artist Interview August 23rd, 2020
LHR/MCT Hanan Sultan Rhymes Frankincense with Minimalism


Artist Interview August 24th, 2020
DXB Augustine Paredes Taking Up Space

Artist Interview August 26th, 2020
AUH Sarah Almehairi Initiates Conversations

Market Interview August 28th, 2020
AUH/DXB 101 Pioneers Ethical and Curious Art Collecting


Exhibition September 1st, 2020
DXB Alserkal Arts Foundation Presents Mohamed Melehi


Market Interview September 4th, 2020
DXB Meet Tamila Kochkarova Behind ‘No Boys Allowed’


Artist Interview September 7th, 2020
DXB Taaboogah Infuses Comedy Into Khaleeji Menswear

Artist Interview September 10th, 2020
LHR/CAI Alaa Hindia’s Jewelry Revives Egyptian Nostalgia

Curator Interview September 14th, 2020
UAE Tawahadna Introduces MENA Artists to a Global Community

Exhibition Review September 24th, 2020
MIA a_part Gives Artists 36 Hours to React


Artist Interview September 27th, 2020
AUH BAIT 15 Welcomes New Member Zuhoor Al Sayegh

Market Interview October 14th, 2021
DXB Thaely Kicks Off Sustainable Sneakers


Exhibition Review October 19th, 2020
DXB Do You See Me How I See You?


Exhibition October 22nd, 2020
TYO James Jarvis Presents Latest Collages at 3110NZ


Exhibition Review October 22nd, 2020
AUH Ogamdo: Crossing a Cultural Highway between Korea and the UAE


Book Review October 28th, 2020
DAM Investigating the Catalogues of the National Museum of Damascus


Exhibition Review November 13th, 2020
DXB
Kanye Says Listen to the Kids: Youth Takeover at Jameel Arts Centre


Exhibition Review November 16th, 2021
DXB Melehi’s Waves Complicate Waving Goodbye


Exhibition Review November 19th, 2020
DXB Spotlight on Dubai Design Week 2020


Exhibition Review November 21st, 2020
DXB 101 Strikes Again with Second Sale at Alserkal Avenue


Exhibition Review
November 23rd, 2020


AUH SEAF Cohort 7 at Warehouse 421


Exhibition Review December 9th, 2020
SHJ Sharjah Art Foundation Jets Ahead on the Flying Saucer


Curator Interview January 25th, 2021
DXB Sa Tahanan Collective Redefines Home for Filipino Artists


Exhibition Review February 21st, 2021
GRV MIA Anywhere Hosts First Virtual Exhibition of Female Chechen Artists  

🎙️GAD Talk Series –– Season 1 2020


November 1st, 2020
1. What is Global Art Daily? 2015 to Now

November 16th, 2020
2. Where is Global Art Daily? An Open Coversation on Migration as Art Practitioners


November 29th, 2020
3. When the Youth Takes Over: Reflecting on the 2020 Jameel Arts Centre Youth Takeover

December 20th, 2020
4. Young Curators in Tokyo: The Making of The 5th Floor

January 27th, 2021
5. How To Create Digital Networks in The Art World?

E-Issue 02 –– NYC
Spring 2021

February 21st, 2021



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in NYC
  3. Pop(Corn): Zeid Jaouni
  4. You Can Take The Girl Out Of The City
  5. Rapport: NYC
  6. Kindergarten Records Discuss The Future of Electronic Music
  7. Sole DXB Brings NY Hip-Hop To Abu Dhabi
  8. Wei Han Finds ‘Home’ In New York
  9. Vikram Divecha: Encounters and Negotiations

E-02++
Spring/Summer 2021

Exhibition Review March 3rd, 2021
DXB There’s a Hurricane at the Foundry


Exhibition Review March 7th, 2021
AUH Re-viewing Contrasts: Hyphenated Spaces at Warehouse421


Curator Interview March 21st, 2021
DXB Permeability and Regional Nodes: Sohrab Hura on Curating Growing Like a Tree at Ishara Art Foundation


Exhibition March 28th, 2021
DXB Alserkal Art Week Top Picks


Exhibition Review April 1st, 2021
DXB A ‘Menu Poem’ and All That Follows


Exhibition Review April 5th, 2021
DXB A Riot Towards Landscapes


Exhibition April 16th, 2021
RUH Noor Riyadh Shines Light on Saudi Arabia’s 2030 Art Strategy


Artist Interview April 26th, 2021
CTU/AUH/YYZ Sabrina Zhao: Between Abu Dhabi, Sichuan, and Toronto


Exhibition Review April 27th, 2021
TYO BIEN Opens Two Solo Exhibitions in Island Japan and Parcel


Artist Interview April 28th, 2021
DXB Ana Escobar: Objects Revisited


Exhibition May 9th, 2021
LDN Fulfilment Services Ltd. Questions Techno-Capitalism on Billboards in London


Artist Interview May 11th, 2021
BAH Mihrab: Mysticism, Devotion, and Geo-Identity


Curator Interview May 20th, 2021
DXB There Is A You In The Cloud You Can’t Delete: A Review of “Age of You” at Jameel Arts Centre

Market Interview May 26th, 2021
TYO Startbahn, Japan’s Leading Art Blockchain Company, Builds a New Art Infrastructure for the Digital Age

Exhibition June 11th, 2021
TYO “Mimicry of Hollows” Opens at The 5th Floor


Exhibiton Review June 20th, 2021
AUH “Total Landscaping”at Warehouse 421


Artist Interview June 30th, 2021
OSA Rintaro Fuse Curates “Silent Category” at Creative Center Osaka


Exhibition Review August 9th, 2021
DXB “After The Beep”: A Review and Some Reflections

E-Issue 03 ––TYO
Fall 2021

October 1st, 2022



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in TYO
  3. Pop(Corn): Nimyu
  4. Ahmad The Japanese: Bady Dalloul on Japan and Belonging
  5. Rapport: Tokyo
  6. Alexandre Taalba Redefines Virtuality at The 5th Floor
  7. Imagining Distant Ecologies in Hypersonic Tokyo: A Review of “Floating Between the Tropical and Glacial Zones”
  8. Ruba Al-Sweel Curates “Garden of e-arthly Delights” at SUMAC Space
  9. Salwa Mikdadi Reflects on the Opening of NYU Abu Dhabi’s Arab Center for the Study of Art

E-03++
Fall/Winter 2021-22


Market Interview October 6th, 2021
RUH HH Prince Fahad Al Saud Discusses Saudi Arabia’s Artistic Renaissance


Exhibition October 7th, 2021
RUH Misk Art Institute’s Annual Flagship Exhibition Explores the Universality of Identity


Curator Interview October 15th, 2021
IST “Once Upon a Time Inconceivable”: A Review and a Conversation


Exhibition Review October 16th, 2021
AUH Woman as a Noun, and a Practice: “As We Gaze Upon Her” at Warehouse421



Exhibition Review February 11th, 2022

Artist Interview February 26th, 2022
TYO Akira Takayama on McDonald’s Radio University, Heterotopia, and Wagner Project


Artist Interview March 10th, 2022
DXB Prepare The Ingredients and Let The Rest Flow: Miramar and Zaid’s “Pure Data” Premieres at Satellite for Quoz Arts Fest 2022


Exhibition March 11th, 2022
DXB Must-See Exhibitions in Dubai - Art Week Edition 2022


Exhibition Review March 14th, 2022
DXB Art Dubai Digital, An Alternative Art World?

E-Issue 04 –– IST
Spring 2022

March 15th, 2022



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in IST
  3. Pop(Corn): Refik Anadol
  4. Rapport: Istanbul
  5. Independent Spaces in Istanbul: Sarp Özer on Operating AVTO

E-04++
Spring/Summer 2022


Curator Interview March 21st, 2022

Market Interview March 28th, 2022
DXB Dubai's Postmodern Architecture: Constructing the Future with 3dr Models


Exhibition April 23rd, 2022
HK Startbahn Presents “Made in Japan 3.0: Defining a New Phy-gital Reality”, an NFT Pop-Up at K11 Art Mall


Exhibition May 6th, 2022
IST
Istanbul’s 5533 Presents Nazlı Khoshkhabar’s “Around and Round”


Artist Interview May 13th, 2022
DXB
“We Are Witnessing History”: Ramin Haerizadeh, Rokni Haerizadeh and Hesam Rahmanian On Their Retrospective Exhibition at NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery

Artist Interview June 13th, 2022
DXB “Geometry is Everywhere”: An Interview and Walking Tour of Order of Magnitude, Jitish Kallat’s Solo Exhibition at Dubai’s Ishara Art Foundation


Exhibition June 21st, 2022
DXB Art Jameel Joins The World Weather Network in a Groundbreaking Response to Global Climate Crisis

Exhibition June 27th, 2022
UAE
What’s On in the UAE: Our Top Summer Picks

Curator Interview July 9th, 2022
IST Creating an Artist Books Library in Istanbul: Aslı Özdoyuran on BAS

E-Issue 05 –– VCE
Fall 2022

September 5th, 2022



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in VCE
  3. Pop(Corn): UAE National Pavilion
  4. Rapport: Venice
  5. Zeitgeist of our Time: Füsun Onur for the Turkish Pavilion at the 59th Venice Biennale
  6. GAD’s Top Picks: National Pavilions
  7. Strangers to the Museum Wall: Kehinde Wiley’s Venice Exhibition Speaks of Violence and Portraiture
  8. Questioning Everyday Life: Alluvium by Ramin Haerizadeh, Rokni Haerizadeh and Hesam Rahmanian at OGR Torino in Venice

E-05++
Fall/Winter 2022-23


Market Interview June 28th, 2022
HK
How Pearl Lam Built Her Gallery Between China and Europe


Exhibition November 11th, 2022
TYO
“Atami Blues” Brings Together UAE-Based and Japanese Artists in HOTEL ACAO ANNEX


Exhibition December 2nd, 2022
TYO Wetland Lab Proposes Sustainable Cement Alternative in Tokyo

Artist Interview December 9th, 2022
DXB Navjot Altaf Unpacks Eco-Feminism and Post-Pandemic Reality at Ishara Art Foundation

Artist Interview January 8th, 2023
TYO Shu Yonezawa and the Art of Animation

Artist Interview January 19th, 2023
NYC Reflecting on Her Southwestern Chinese Bai Roots, Peishan Huang Captures Human Traces on Objects and Spaces

Exhibition Review February 9th, 2023
DXB Augustine Paredes Builds His Paradise Home at Gulf Photo Plus

Artist Interview February 22nd, 2023
DXB Persia Beheshti Shares Thoughts on Virtual Worlds and the State of Video Art in Dubai Ahead of Her Screening at Bayt Al Mamzar

E-Issue 06 –– DXB/SHJ
Spring 2023

April 12th, 2023



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in the UAE
  3. Pop(Corn): Jumairy
  4. Rapport: Art Dubai 2023
  5. Highlights from Sharjah Biennial 15
  6. Is Time Just an Illusion? A Review of "Notations on Time" at Ishara Art Foundation
  7. Saif Mhaisen and His Community at Bayt AlMamzar









DXB Christopher Joshua Benton to Debut Mubeen, City as Archive at The Third Line Shop in Collaboration with Global Art Daily

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Highlights from Sharjah Biennial 15


By Hamda Althani

Published on April 12th, 2023

        The Sharjah Biennial is celebrating its 30th anniversary. Featuring works by over 150 artists from various countries, the biennial kicked off on the 7th of February and will be on until the 11th of June. Reaching the end of my internship with Sharjah Art Foundation (SAF), I had the opportunity to observe some of the behind-the-scenes activities of the biennial. It fascinates me to see how the various organization’s departments work together to create such a large-scale exhibition. Working behind-the-scenes made me understand how important curating is to making sure the art communicates with its audience and thinking about how it affects the community it surrounds. Locations are also spread out within the towns of the Sharjah Emirate, making it the biggest biennial thus far.

         As its 30th anniversary, the Sharjah Biennial provides an opportunity to reflect on the various connections and conversations in the region. Hosted by Sharjah Art Foundation, the biennial first edition was held back in 1993. It was organized by the Department of Culture and information of the Emirate of Sharjah, which in turn then  appointed Hoor Al Qasimi as head curator in 2003. The 15th edition of the Sharjah Biennial, “Thinking Historically in the Present,” focuses on post-colonialism while exploring the intersectional themes of race, tradition, and imagination. The theme was initially conceptualized by Nigerian curator and writer Okwui Enwezor. Before he passed away in 2019, Al Qasimi carried out his vision and oversaw the biennial. Enwezor was known for his extensive research on global modernisms, the history of museums, exhibitions, and curatorial practice, as well as theories about migration, diaspora, and post-colonial modernisms. Through a comprehensive presentation of over 300 works, Al Qasimi was able to interpret and contextualize Enwezor's vision.


1.  Isaac Julien, Once Again … (Statues Never Die), 2022. Commissioned by Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia, and Ford Foundation, New York; co-commissioned by Sharjah Art Foundation. Additional support provided by Linda Pace Foundation, San Antonio, USA; Carol Weinbaum; Wemhöner Collection, Berlin; and University of California, Santa Cruz. Installation view: Sharjah Biennial 15, Calligraphy Square, Sharjah, 2023. Image courtesy of Sharjah Art Foundation. Photo: Motaz Mawid.

Installation has played a role in the biennial’s most powerful works. Artists utilize the cruel experiences of colonization by creating immersive experiences that leave viewers in awe. Currently, works are exhibited at 17 different venues across the Emirate of Sharjah, including Sharjah, Al Hamriyah, Al Dhaid, Kalba, and Khorfakkan, allowing the art to be accessible to residents living within the towns. Many structures that were repurposed include the Old Al Dhaid Clinic, Kalba Kindergarten, and Old Al Jubail Vegetable Market. The Biennial takes place in various locations around the city's landmarks, the sites were used in a way to bring all art and artist to fit thematically. We are immersed in motherhood at Bait AlSerkal, transported to the possibilities of a new future at the Flying Saucer, reminded of the migration pain at Kalba Ice Factory and Khorfakkan Art Centre, and exposed to the postcolonial reality that someone else is writing our own history with video installations in Khorfakkan and Sharjah’s Calligraphy Square. The postcolonial history connects people who have also gone through similar painful past experiences, sharing a sense to create works by enfolding the viewer into an environment while also altering their subjective perceptions.


We are immersed in motherhood at Bait AlSerkal, transported to the possibilities of a new future at the Flying Saucer, reminded of the migration pain at Kalba Ice Factory and Khorfakkan Art Centre, and exposed to the postcolonial reality that someone else is writing our own history with video installations in Khorfakkan and Sharjah’s Calligraphy Square.



2. Wangechi Mutu, Buried Bride II (right) and Buried Bride III, 2022. From ‘My Mother's Memories, a Mound of Buried Brides’, 2023. Installation view: Sharjah Biennial 15, Bait Al Serkal, Arts Square, Sharjah, 2023. Image courtesy of Sharjah Art Foundation.

Bait Al Serkal was formerly known as the home of Issa Al Serkal, a Commissioner for the British Crown in the Arabian Gulf, and was later turned into the first maternity hospital in the 1960s, where many residents of Sharjah were born. The space’s historical factors were used to exhibit works that interpret maternity, feminism, and womanhood; each piece upholds a unique narrative on these themes. Displayed within the courtyard is Wangechi Mutu’s sculptural installation Mother’s Memories (2023), which resembles a rounded abdomen of a pregnant woman. Climbing onto the installation, we become small again, allowing us to remember an ambiance of warmth within the darkness. In this context, the space allows for an interactive experience, connecting ideas of roots to maternity.


The space’s historical factors were used to exhibit works that interpret maternity, feminism, and womanhood.



2. Wangechi Mutu, Mother Mound, 2023. From ‘My Mother's Memories, a Mound of Buried Brides’, 2023. Commissioned by Sharjah Art Foundation. Installation view: Sharjah Biennial 15, Bait Al Serkal, Arts Square, Sharjah, 2023. Image courtesy of Sharjah Art Foundation. Photo: Shanavas Jamaluddin.


After birth, we continue on our journey looking for new beginnings on the way, sometimes a blank canvas to reinvent and correct what has been done in the past. Like the possibility of another planet, a ground zero for a new civilization where all prejudice is gone, and we can enter a new era of equality and freedom away from the past. We can see these ideas explored within the Flying Saucer, a space that bears many nostalgic memories to locals. The iconic star-shaped building that was previously known as a restaurant and later renovated as a new space for the foundation. The location offers a space to exhibit otherworldly environments, audiences are invited onto another planet within Kambui Olujimi’s installation comprising paintings, sound, and sculptures exhibited on blue sand, engaging in an outer world experience by wearing shoe coverings as if we’re gearing up to space.

On the other hand, new beginnings are not always in our hands. Sometimes we are forced uprooted from our soil and forced to create new roots in new foreign soil. A harsh reality for many families and societies postcolonialism, among many other reasons. Where this topic was explored in the biennial within Kalba Ice Factory. The space was used to exhibit some of the biennial’s large-scale installations. Doris Salcedo, one of the winners of the 2023 Sharjah Biennial Prize, her sculptural work, Uprooted (2020-22), which consists of 804 dead trees. Through Salcedo's work, she explores the various ways that loss and transformation can be interpreted.

3. Doris Salcedo,Uprooted, 2020–2022. 804 dead trees and steel; 3000 x 650 x 500 cm. Installation view: Sharjah Biennial 15, Kalba Ice Factory, Sharjah Art Foundation, 2023. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Juan Castro.


As part of my internship, I got the chance to meet a few artists and even participate in a collaborative mural project at Khorfakkan Art Centre with artists Meleanna Meyer, Solomon Enos and Kahi Ching. The mural is used to bring their practice and ideas of honoring ancestors while addressing the topic of historical trauma, as well as conveying the healing process, to focus on healing from the past and an empowerment of the present. They gave us the opportunity to reflect on the importance of water as a precious resource within the UAE. Meyer guides us as a community together through our historical similarities by collaborating with other local artists, bringing us to work in harmony. The mural is currently displayed outside the centre.


Meyer guides us as a community together through our historical similarities by collaborating with other local artists, bringing us to work in harmony.



While within the centre we are welcomed by Meyer’s double-sided mural installation Āina Aloha (2016). At six meters wide, the mural expresses earthly tones to the native Hawaiian nature and people, creating a narrative of passing on tradition from one generation to the next while also celebrating land, culture, and spirit. It is quite a counterpoint to the Hawaiian tourist industry's exotically-themed clichés. As continue towards the backside of the mural, at that moment, we realized that the narrative did not end, as pain lingers on the other side, abstract shapes take over with hands reaching out. Reminiscent of Pablo Picasso’s Guernica, she explored through this work the relationship between Hawaiian culture and cruel ways of colonization. Later when we spoke, Meyer explained the reasoning behind the teal color that contrasts with the bright red, she said “I wanted to allow the healing process to flow through from the other side of the mural, almost like a portal”.


“I wanted to allow the healing process to flow through from the other side of the mural, almost like a portal.”

- Meleanna Meyer

Also dealing with persistent pain of the colonial past, Um Al Dhabaab (Mother of Fog) (2023), a film by Farah Al Qasimi humorously shows a British sailor wrongly identifying the ruling tribe of Ras Al Khaimah as pirates and the folkloric tales that stemmed from the colonial rule. Experimenting with digital graphics and internet aesthetics, the film challenges the western narrative about the Gulf and its imperialist influences. Al Qasimi further explores the conflict of portrayal within the context of the present day through her work, which draws parallels between her childhood and the pirate-oriented video games she grew up with titled “Monkey Island”. Viewers are invited to sit on bean bags decorated with flower pattern material, creating she creates a welcoming feel, reminiscent of blankets typically used within Arab homes. Al Qasimi is known for incorporating patterned blankets in numerous works.

4. Farah Al Qasimi, Um Al Dhabab (Mother of Fog), 2023. Co-produced by Sharjah Art Foundation and KADIST, Paris and San Francisco. Installation view: Sharjah Biennial 15, Khorfakkan Art Centre, 2023. Image courtesy of Sharjah Art Foundation. Photo: Danko Stjepanovic.



Experimenting with digital graphics and internet aesthetics, the film challenges the western narrative about the Gulf and its imperialist influences.



One of the most captivating pieces of the biennial is Isaac Julien’s five-channel video installation, Once Again … (Statues Never Die) (2022) in Calligraphy Square. The video installation shares with us footage of looted African art, stolen by traders, explorers and colonial officials as part of their collections. Further dispute on how these artifacts came to ownership, which still remains an issue to the present day, as many individuals feel a loss of heritage and identity. Within the film Julien also creates a conversation with two influential figures: Albert Barnes, an African art collector, and Alain Locke, a philosopher and critic. He explores the relationship between Barnes and Locke, focusing on their differing points of view regarding the acceptance and categorization of Black artists. One of the many highlights within the film features Alice Smith’s voice, adding a new layer of emotion with her empowering lyrics, “I’m making a new way … for us once again”, signifying the desire for new beginnings.

The addition of reflective aluminum behind the screens creates an illusion of a large space, while the experience itself requires the viewers to move within the space and connect the visuals together as each screen projects a different angle to the story. The overall atmosphere transports us to another dimension, making us forget that we are still in Sharjah. Through the video installation, viewers are able to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation, as these historical pieces hold a sense of pride for those whose ancestors created them. Awed by the performance, It lead to me to revisit the installation several times.


3. Above:  African ceremonial mask, unknown location (year unknown) presented as part of Isaac Julien’s Once Again … (Statues Never Die), 2022. Commissioned by Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia, and Ford Foundation, New York; co-commissioned by Sharjah Art Foundation. Additional support provided by Linda Pace Foundation, San Antonio, USA; Carol Weinbaum; Wemhöner Collection, Berlin; and University of California, Santa Cruz. Installation view: Sharjah Biennial 15, Calligraphy Square, Sharjah, 2023. Image courtesy of Sharjah Art Foundation. Photo: Motaz Mawid.
Bottom:  Richmond Barthé, Stevedore (1937), presented as part of Isaac Julien’s Once Again … (Statues Never Die), 2022. Commissioned by Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia, and Ford Foundation, New York; co-commissioned by Sharjah Art Foundation. Additional support provided by Linda Pace Foundation, San Antonio, USA; Carol Weinbaum; Wemhöner Collection, Berlin; and University of California, Santa Cruz. Installation view: Sharjah Biennial 15, Calligraphy Square, Sharjah, 2023. Image courtesy of Sharjah Art Foundation. Photo: Motaz Mawid.


The pieces that have caught my attention have led me to think about my own new beginnings, finishing up my last semester of college. I look forward to continuing my own practice and bringing life to new art. Overall, the works of Sharjah Biennial 15, and theme avoid providing definitive answers to the questions addressed in art historical discourses and canonical works but have instead encouraged a space of collective engagement while allowing the public to participate in the immersive experience.

Enwezor’s impact truly broke down stereotypes and barriers, expanding the Western perspective while bringing to Sharjah a fresh perspective that drew from the past to push forward into the present. It is not possible to visit every location of the Biennial in a day, but I recommend visitors take the time to thoroughly explore the various areas of the city.


Enwezor’s impact truly broke down stereotypes and barriers, expanding the Western perspective while bringing to Sharjah a fresh perspective that drew from the past to push forward into the present.





Hamda Althani is a multidisciplinary artist, her practice explores the impact of the Internet on culture and identity through a variety of mediums including, video, installation and painting. 


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