E-Issue 07 –– AUH
Winter 2023-24

January 29th, 2024



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in Abu Dhabi/Dubai
  3. Cover Interview: Shaikha Al Ketbi on Darawan
  4. Rapport: Public Art in the Gulf and a Case Study of Manar Abu Dhabi
  5. Hashel Al Lamki’s Survey Exhibition Maqam Reflects on a Decade of Practice in Abu Dhabi
  6. “You Can’t Stand on a Movement”: Michelangelo Pistoletto Interviews Benton Interviewing Pistoletto

E-07++
Winter/Spring 2024


Curators Interview May 14, 2024
AUH Embracing Change through an Open System: Maya Allison and Duygu Demir on “In Real Time” at NYUAD Art Gallery



About ––

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    Contributors
    Contact

Interviews ––

    Selected Archive

Open Call ––

    Policy
    E-08 Seoul

Newsletter ––




Chronological Archive ––

    Selected Archive

Artist Interview November 18th, 2016
AUH Raed Yassin in Abu Dhabi

Editorial March 1st, 2018
AUH Abu Dhabi Is The New Calabasas

Exhibition Listing May 22nd, 2018
DXB Christopher Benton: If We Don't Reclaim Our History, The Sand Will

Artist Interview June 15th, 2018
TYO An Interview with BIEN, a Rising Japanese Artist

Artist Interview July 17th, 2018
TYO Rintaro Fuse on Selfies and Cave Painting

Artist Interview August 28th, 2018
BER Slavs and Tatars: “Pulling a Thread to Undo The Sweater”

Artist Interview September 1st, 2018
NYC Shirin Neshat In Conversation with Sophie Arni and Ev Zverev

Artist Interview September 1st, 2018
PAR Hottest Spices: Michèle Lamy

E-Issue 01 –– AUH/DXB
Summer 2020

August 1st, 2020



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in the UAE
  3. Pop(Corn): Hashel Al Lamki
  4. Tailoring in Abu Dhabi
  5. Rapport: Dubai
  6. Michael Rakowitz From the Diaspora


E-01++
Fall/Winter 2020-21


Artist Interview August 23rd, 2020
LHR/MCT Hanan Sultan Rhymes Frankincense with Minimalism


Artist Interview August 24th, 2020
DXB Augustine Paredes Taking Up Space

Artist Interview August 26th, 2020
AUH Sarah Almehairi Initiates Conversations

Market Interview August 28th, 2020
AUH/DXB 101 Pioneers Ethical and Curious Art Collecting


Exhibition September 1st, 2020
DXB Alserkal Arts Foundation Presents Mohamed Melehi


Market Interview September 4th, 2020
DXB Meet Tamila Kochkarova Behind ‘No Boys Allowed’


Artist Interview September 7th, 2020
DXB Taaboogah Infuses Comedy Into Khaleeji Menswear

Artist Interview September 10th, 2020
LHR/CAI Alaa Hindia’s Jewelry Revives Egyptian Nostalgia

Curator Interview September 14th, 2020
UAE Tawahadna Introduces MENA Artists to a Global Community

Exhibition Review September 24th, 2020
MIA a_part Gives Artists 36 Hours to React


Artist Interview September 27th, 2020
AUH BAIT 15 Welcomes New Member Zuhoor Al Sayegh

Market Interview October 14th, 2021
DXB Thaely Kicks Off Sustainable Sneakers


Exhibition Review October 19th, 2020
DXB Do You See Me How I See You?


Exhibition October 22nd, 2020
TYO James Jarvis Presents Latest Collages at 3110NZ


Exhibition Review October 22nd, 2020
AUH Ogamdo: Crossing a Cultural Highway between Korea and the UAE


Book Review October 28th, 2020
DAM Investigating the Catalogues of the National Museum of Damascus


Exhibition Review November 13th, 2020
DXB
Kanye Says Listen to the Kids: Youth Takeover at Jameel Arts Centre


Exhibition Review November 16th, 2021
DXB Melehi’s Waves Complicate Waving Goodbye


Exhibition Review November 19th, 2020
DXB Spotlight on Dubai Design Week 2020


Exhibition Review November 21st, 2020
DXB 101 Strikes Again with Second Sale at Alserkal Avenue


Exhibition Review
November 23rd, 2020


AUH SEAF Cohort 7 at Warehouse 421


Exhibition Review December 9th, 2020
SHJ Sharjah Art Foundation Jets Ahead on the Flying Saucer


Curator Interview January 25th, 2021
DXB Sa Tahanan Collective Redefines Home for Filipino Artists


Exhibition Review February 21st, 2021
GRV MIA Anywhere Hosts First Virtual Exhibition of Female Chechen Artists  

🎙️GAD Talk Series –– Season 1 2020


November 1st, 2020
1. What is Global Art Daily? 2015 to Now

November 16th, 2020
2. Where is Global Art Daily? An Open Coversation on Migration as Art Practitioners


November 29th, 2020
3. When the Youth Takes Over: Reflecting on the 2020 Jameel Arts Centre Youth Takeover

December 20th, 2020
4. Young Curators in Tokyo: The Making of The 5th Floor

January 27th, 2021
5. How To Create Digital Networks in The Art World?

E-Issue 02 –– NYC
Spring 2021

February 21st, 2021



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in NYC
  3. Pop(Corn): Zeid Jaouni
  4. You Can Take The Girl Out Of The City
  5. Rapport: NYC
  6. Kindergarten Records Discuss The Future of Electronic Music
  7. Sole DXB Brings NY Hip-Hop To Abu Dhabi
  8. Wei Han Finds ‘Home’ In New York
  9. Vikram Divecha: Encounters and Negotiations

E-02++
Spring/Summer 2021

Exhibition Review March 3rd, 2021
DXB There’s a Hurricane at the Foundry


Exhibition Review March 7th, 2021
AUH Re-viewing Contrasts: Hyphenated Spaces at Warehouse421


Curator Interview March 21st, 2021
DXB Permeability and Regional Nodes: Sohrab Hura on Curating Growing Like a Tree at Ishara Art Foundation


Exhibition March 28th, 2021
DXB Alserkal Art Week Top Picks


Exhibition Review April 1st, 2021
DXB A ‘Menu Poem’ and All That Follows


Exhibition Review April 5th, 2021
DXB A Riot Towards Landscapes


Exhibition April 16th, 2021
RUH Noor Riyadh Shines Light on Saudi Arabia’s 2030 Art Strategy


Artist Interview April 26th, 2021
CTU/AUH/YYZ Sabrina Zhao: Between Abu Dhabi, Sichuan, and Toronto


Exhibition Review April 27th, 2021
TYO BIEN Opens Two Solo Exhibitions in Island Japan and Parcel


Artist Interview April 28th, 2021
DXB Ana Escobar: Objects Revisited


Exhibition May 9th, 2021
LDN Fulfilment Services Ltd. Questions Techno-Capitalism on Billboards in London


Artist Interview May 11th, 2021
BAH Mihrab: Mysticism, Devotion, and Geo-Identity


Curator Interview May 20th, 2021
DXB There Is A You In The Cloud You Can’t Delete: A Review of “Age of You” at Jameel Arts Centre

Market Interview May 26th, 2021
TYO Startbahn, Japan’s Leading Art Blockchain Company, Builds a New Art Infrastructure for the Digital Age

Exhibition June 11th, 2021
TYO “Mimicry of Hollows” Opens at The 5th Floor


Exhibiton Review June 20th, 2021
AUH “Total Landscaping”at Warehouse 421


Artist Interview June 30th, 2021
OSA Rintaro Fuse Curates “Silent Category” at Creative Center Osaka


Exhibition Review August 9th, 2021
DXB “After The Beep”: A Review and Some Reflections

E-Issue 03 ––TYO
Fall 2021

October 1st, 2022



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in TYO
  3. Pop(Corn): Nimyu
  4. Ahmad The Japanese: Bady Dalloul on Japan and Belonging
  5. Rapport: Tokyo
  6. Alexandre Taalba Redefines Virtuality at The 5th Floor
  7. Imagining Distant Ecologies in Hypersonic Tokyo: A Review of “Floating Between the Tropical and Glacial Zones”
  8. Ruba Al-Sweel Curates “Garden of e-arthly Delights” at SUMAC Space
  9. Salwa Mikdadi Reflects on the Opening of NYU Abu Dhabi’s Arab Center for the Study of Art

E-03++
Fall/Winter 2021-22


Market Interview October 6th, 2021
RUH HH Prince Fahad Al Saud Discusses Saudi Arabia’s Artistic Renaissance


Exhibition October 7th, 2021
RUH Misk Art Institute’s Annual Flagship Exhibition Explores the Universality of Identity


Curator Interview October 15th, 2021
IST “Once Upon a Time Inconceivable”: A Review and a Conversation


Exhibition Review October 16th, 2021
AUH Woman as a Noun, and a Practice: “As We Gaze Upon Her” at Warehouse421



Exhibition Review February 11th, 2022

Artist Interview February 26th, 2022
TYO Akira Takayama on McDonald’s Radio University, Heterotopia, and Wagner Project


Artist Interview March 10th, 2022
DXB Prepare The Ingredients and Let The Rest Flow: Miramar and Zaid’s “Pure Data” Premieres at Satellite for Quoz Arts Fest 2022


Exhibition March 11th, 2022
DXB Must-See Exhibitions in Dubai - Art Week Edition 2022


Exhibition Review March 14th, 2022
DXB Art Dubai Digital, An Alternative Art World?

E-Issue 04 –– IST
Spring 2022

March 15th, 2022



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in IST
  3. Pop(Corn): Refik Anadol
  4. Rapport: Istanbul
  5. Independent Spaces in Istanbul: Sarp Özer on Operating AVTO

E-04++
Spring/Summer 2022


Curator Interview March 21st, 2022

Market Interview March 28th, 2022
DXB Dubai's Postmodern Architecture: Constructing the Future with 3dr Models


Exhibition April 23rd, 2022
HK Startbahn Presents “Made in Japan 3.0: Defining a New Phy-gital Reality”, an NFT Pop-Up at K11 Art Mall


Exhibition May 6th, 2022
IST
Istanbul’s 5533 Presents Nazlı Khoshkhabar’s “Around and Round”


Artist Interview May 13th, 2022
DXB
“We Are Witnessing History”: Ramin Haerizadeh, Rokni Haerizadeh and Hesam Rahmanian On Their Retrospective Exhibition at NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery

Artist Interview June 13th, 2022
DXB “Geometry is Everywhere”: An Interview and Walking Tour of Order of Magnitude, Jitish Kallat’s Solo Exhibition at Dubai’s Ishara Art Foundation


Exhibition June 21st, 2022
DXB Art Jameel Joins The World Weather Network in a Groundbreaking Response to Global Climate Crisis

Exhibition June 27th, 2022
UAE
What’s On in the UAE: Our Top Summer Picks

Curator Interview July 9th, 2022
IST Creating an Artist Books Library in Istanbul: Aslı Özdoyuran on BAS

E-Issue 05 –– VCE
Fall 2022

September 5th, 2022



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in VCE
  3. Pop(Corn): UAE National Pavilion
  4. Rapport: Venice
  5. Zeitgeist of our Time: Füsun Onur for the Turkish Pavilion at the 59th Venice Biennale
  6. GAD’s Top Picks: National Pavilions
  7. Strangers to the Museum Wall: Kehinde Wiley’s Venice Exhibition Speaks of Violence and Portraiture
  8. Questioning Everyday Life: Alluvium by Ramin Haerizadeh, Rokni Haerizadeh and Hesam Rahmanian at OGR Torino in Venice

E-05++
Fall/Winter 2022-23


Market Interview June 28th, 2022
HK
How Pearl Lam Built Her Gallery Between China and Europe


Exhibition November 11th, 2022
TYO
“Atami Blues” Brings Together UAE-Based and Japanese Artists in HOTEL ACAO ANNEX


Exhibition December 2nd, 2022
TYO Wetland Lab Proposes Sustainable Cement Alternative in Tokyo

Artist Interview December 9th, 2022
DXB Navjot Altaf Unpacks Eco-Feminism and Post-Pandemic Reality at Ishara Art Foundation

Artist Interview January 8th, 2023
TYO Shu Yonezawa and the Art of Animation

Artist Interview January 19th, 2023
NYC Reflecting on Her Southwestern Chinese Bai Roots, Peishan Huang Captures Human Traces on Objects and Spaces

Exhibition Review February 9th, 2023
DXB Augustine Paredes Builds His Paradise Home at Gulf Photo Plus

Artist Interview February 22nd, 2023
DXB Persia Beheshti Shares Thoughts on Virtual Worlds and the State of Video Art in Dubai Ahead of Her Screening at Bayt Al Mamzar

E-Issue 06 –– DXB/SHJ
Spring 2023

April 12th, 2023



  1. Editor’s Note
  2. What’s On in the UAE
  3. Pop(Corn): Jumairy
  4. Rapport: Art Dubai 2023
  5. Highlights from Sharjah Biennial 15
  6. Is Time Just an Illusion? A Review of "Notations on Time" at Ishara Art Foundation
  7. Saif Mhaisen and His Community at Bayt AlMamzar









DXB Christopher Joshua Benton to Debut Mubeen, City as Archive at The Third Line Shop in Collaboration with Global Art Daily

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Postmordial Soup Brings Together Ziad Al Najjar, Talal Al Najjar and Miramar Al Nayyar at ICD Brookfield Place


By Susanne Niemann
Published on October 18th, 2023

        Let Dubai’s art season begin: this October, Tabari ArtSpace and ICD Brookfield Place brought together a dynamic trio of artists under an exciting, experimental multimedia exhibition titled Postmordial Soup.

Brothers Ziad and Talal Al Najjar, emerging as leading voices of the Emirates’ next-generation artists, shared the large ground floor gallery of pristine ICD Brookfield Place with Amman-based painter and multimedia artist Miramar Al Nayyar

In an in-depth interview, the artists share their processes and their thinking behind the making of this exhibition, a 4-weeks art residency culminating in a grand opening party. 


1. Ziad Al Najjar, Talal Al Najjar, Miramar Al Nayyar, Postmordial Soup, 2023. Installation views at ICD Brookfield Place, Dubai, UAE, October 2023. Photo courtesy of Tabari ArtSpace and ICD Brookfield Place Arts.


Susanne Niemann: Ziad, Talal and Miramar, together you are creating an otherworldly space with Postmordial Soup. How are your three practices coming together in this group exhibition? What drew you to these questions of time, past and future, foreign and familiar, natural, digital, and physical?

Talal Al Najjar: 
Ziad, Miramar, and I came together during a 4-week residency where we not only created new works on-site but also engaged in continuous discussions, reevaluation, and refinement of our ideas and the overall exhibition concept. This experience was enriching for all of us, as we learned from one another and reverberated the importance of artistic dialogue. Despite our unique artistic backgrounds, our practices share common themes and interests. The three of us have deep fascinations with history, mythologies, and personal and larger questions of human (and non-human) condition. These shared elements fostered a collaborative approach in shaping the exhibition, with themes such as nature, artificiality, the human body, time, histories, alternative perspectives, and cultural heritage being explored and interpreted in various ways throughout the exhibition. The different media we engage in also helped manifest the plethora of concepts that stirred up in our soup.

Miramar Al Nayyar: When you think about all of these contradictions, you get a soup! Immersed in a dense mixture, almost like someone momentarily decided to flatten the singularity into a bowl of soup. Residing within a dualistic system can lead us to view life linearly, often overlooking the circular nature of existence, where the beginning is the same as the end. By defamiliarizing what’s familiar, we disrupts this dualistic perspective, allowing the future and the past to blend together. In this altered lens, you can see everything as if it's contained in a single bowl of soup, where the future and the past converge into a unified whole.

Ziad Al Najjar: Through conversation. We were talking and getting to know each other before we began working in the space, and for the most part it was about getting to know each other and our interests which influence our practices. The curiosities and speculations of the past, the influences of today, and the Postmordial Soup of the future led us to realize the overlapping questions each of us fundamentally had in realizing the exhibition we imagined creating.


Ziad, Miramar, and I came together during a 4-week residency where we not only created new works on-site but also engaged in continuous discussions, reevaluation, and refinement of our ideas and the overall exhibition concept.

- Talal Al Najjar



2. Ziad Al Najjar, Talal Al Najjar, Miramar Al Nayyar, Postmordial Soup, 2023. Installation views at ICD Brookfield Place, Dubai, UAE, October 2023. Photo courtesy of Tabari ArtSpace and ICD Brookfield Place Arts.


S.N.: Postmordial Soup responds to questions on the origins of life and the influences of the soup that shape the contemporary condition. Can you tell me more about that? What does this mean for you? What questions did you ask yourselves during the residency program with ICD Brookfield Place in collaboration with Tabari Artspace?

T.N.: The scientific theories revolving what is called the “primordial soup” was something we all had keen interest in our own lives, given our own fascinations with related subjects, and we wanted to consider what the “postmordial soup” would be or mean in today’s (or tomorrow’s) world. We started with the primordial soup concept and in a collective meeting I suggested we title the show Postmordial Soup and proposed the idea that we then continuously evolved, months before we even started the residency. It was an amazing experience collectively processing, mythologizing, and theorizing what this would manifest as, both conceptually and physically in the exhibition space. Being situated in the context of a financial distinct made it even more stimulating and fitting to what our contemporary world and human culture revolves around, obviously this would become an ingredient in our “postmordial soup.”

Z.N.: We saw this overlapping dialogue between nature, the human body, and technology, with an underlining absurdity and uncanniness. With my contributions of paintings in the show I was thinking about the primordial soup in terms of body. From the depiction of babies in a womb to the deer sleeping in the fetal position, from subtle color abstractions and cell-like mark making to a diptych of visceral foveolar cells. I’m really considering the body in my work as a confronting subject of our own physicality, mortality, sanctity, and evolution that connects ourselves to everything else.


In this altered lens, you can see everything as if it's contained in a single bowl of soup, where the future and the past converge into a unified whole.

- Miramar Al Nayyar



2. Night view of Ziad Al Najjar, Talal Al Najjar, Miramar Al Nayyar, Postmordial Soup, 2023. Installation views at ICD Brookfield Place, Dubai, UAE, October 2023. Photo courtesy of Tabari ArtSpace and ICD Brookfield Place Arts.


S.N.: Postmordial Soup invites visitors into an immersive experience at ICD Brookfield Place, a lifestyle and business hub in Dubai. Has this socio-geographic context played a role for you when you created your work and envisioned the experience? What do you hope visitors take from the exhibition? How do you want them to feel?

T.N.: It was quite a different experience during the residency while creating works in the space where passerbys would peak in and watch us at work. I think the more corporate nature of the district and building’s context made it more fun to create an exhibition like Postmordial Soup–an uncanny, unconventional, and ultra-contemporary exhibition–and in this context these aspects were applified due to this juxtaposition.

M.N.: On a personal note, I've always had a penchant for disruption— a bit of a vandal, if you will. This tendency existed even before I began my journey in art, as I used to dismantle all the toys my mom bought me. However, once art became a part of my life, I found a constructive outlet for this tendency. My experience at the corporate setting of the ICD rekindled that innate tendency and actually encouraged disruption within my creative process. We aimed to shatter the established context of that place, making individuals there feel as though they had stepped out of their usual, familiar surroundings yet they’re inside of it.

Z.N.: I liked the idea of intervening in such a place, especially one that felt so corporate. We worked there for four weeks and at some point, it felt like we were literally building a world inside the space which was, as we planned, dramatically different from the rest. I want the audience to walk into the space and be engrossed in it, almost forgetting what was outside and to have an experience that feels alien, raw, uncanny, maybe a little overwhelming yet also realize it as a world very familiar to them.


I liked the idea of intervening in such a place, especially one that felt so corporate. We worked there for four weeks and at some point, it felt like we were literally building a world inside the space which was, as we planned, dramatically different from the rest.

- Ziad Al Najjar

S.N.: Talal, in your practice you recontextualize, defamiliarize and juxtapose materials and ideas in a way that the familiar becomes unfamiliar. What does your creative process look like? Have there been particular artifacts and references guiding your explorations for this exhibition?

T.N.: My processes are highly driven by collecting and archiving, then recontextualizing, and defamiliarizing via manipulation and distortion. In the studio I like to have an abundance of material, whether it be art and industrial materials and objects, or literature and images that I use as physical and metaphorical/referencial material. I have works that are quite planned out but also create intuitively with these materials at my disposal.

For this exhibition I’ve been focused on artifacts mainly from Sharjah, UAE, one reason being their abundance and prevalence but also the Sharjah Archaeology Authority’s meticulous conservation and accessibility of them. I’ve referenced, remixed, re-translated, and transformed these objects of cultural heritage and used them in combination with what I consider contemporary artifacts, such as internet images of contemporary material culture. In this way I collapse time, history, and culture. The artifacts in my work have manifested both physically and virtually and even in-between (as seen in my holographic works for example). In my video/film works I also animate them, in a way resurrecting these ancient objects using today’s technology, similar to how archaeologists now practice 3D scanning of these objects to virtualize and archive them for conservation and accessibility purposes. For me, using and referencing these objects of cultural heritage is incredibly important, and using them in an art context is another way to allow others to appreciate, understand, and visualize them outside of the historical museum context.

3. Talal Al Najjar’s installations at Postmordial Soup, 2023. Installation views at ICD Brookfield Place, Dubai, UAE, October 2023. Photo courtesy of Tabari ArtSpace and ICD Brookfield Place Arts.


S.N.: Ziad, you work primarily in the two and three-dimensional, exploring materiality, process and perception. I am curious how you are finding your motifs and inspiration. How has living in the UAE and in the US influenced your work?

Z.N.: It’s a process of figuring it our along the way, throughout the process of making the work I’m usually looking through different books, images, and a lot of art as well. There were several books I was particularly looking at with refence to the show such as the wild book of inventions and Anatomical Waxes by David Cronenberg. I grew up and lived in the UAE until I was seventeen and then live in the US for five years to go to university in Chicago. It definitely played a big part in my growth as a person and simultaneously my work, particularly because of its unique creative culture and the variety of artists and art I was exposed to.

4. Ziad Al Najjar’s paintings at Postmordial Soup, 2023. Installation views at ICD Brookfield Place, Dubai, UAE, October 2023. Photo courtesy of Tabari ArtSpace and ICD Brookfield Place Arts.


S.N.: Miramar, your work can be described as bridging between the distinct practices of Talal and Ziad in this exhibition. How have your three worked together during the residency? Has this influenced the works you are showing? Is there one work that is particularly meaningful for you? And if yes, why?

M.N.: Working alongside Talal and Ziad within the same creative space was the genuine act of building bridges. It's a known fact that you can't escape the influence of others when you spend a month in close proximity, especially as an artist, where you're constantly creating and remaining open. I cannot deny the impact they had on my work and creative process. The colors and direction of my art started to evolve in a way different from what I initially planned before arriving in Dubai. You could say that our collaborative experience in the same creative space led to a process of unity, and for me, this was a profoundly powerful and beautiful journey. Witnessing how 30 days of co-creation with such energy manifested itself to the audience during the opening in a single day was truly rewarding, and I'm delighted that people could feel that energy.

In the context of this exhibition, one piece that’s most meaningful is the puzzle artwork. It continues to unravel itself to me, and I am constantly learning more about myself through it. In the aftermath of creating this particular piece, I feel transformed, like another version of myself. I've come to believe that certain creations can give birth to you, rather than the other way around, a catalyst for personal rebirth, and the puzzle artwork exemplifies this transformative experience.


Witnessing how 30 days of co-creation with such energy manifested itself to the audience during the opening in a single day was truly rewarding, and I'm delighted that people could feel that energy.

- Miramar Al Nayyar


6. Miramar Al Nayyar’s puzzle painting at Postmordial Soup, 2023. Installation views at ICD Brookfield Place, Dubai, UAE, October 2023. Photo courtesy of Tabari ArtSpace and ICD Brookfield Place Arts.



Exhibition branding by Safa Sayfaaei.



Saba Sayfaiee, a visual designer from the United Arab Emirates is designing the overall branding for the show. Her main interests lie in editorial design, typography, and branding. In her practice, Saba examines, researches, and explores different cultural, social, and behavioural topics utilizing various mediums. In 2021, she graduated with a B.S. in Visual Communication from the American University of Sharjah.
@78ss

Miramar Al Nayyar (b.1997) is a multi-disciplinary artist hailing from Iraq, currently based between Amman and Dubai. Al Nayyar’s three-dimensional works reveal her profound fascination with the interplay between nature, kinematic phenomena, temporality, and spatiality.Her self-developed technique amalgamates an array of approaches to painting ranging from oil glazing to the thin layering of wet-on-wet paint and airbrushing. Her work has been showcased at Gallery Ras Ain (2017), The Jordan National Gallery of Fine Arts (2018), NOFA Gallery (2020), among others. She has also been a participating artist at numerous festivals and projects such as Baladk Street Art Festival (2017-2019), Distrito Grafiti Festival (2019), Wall of Contemplation project (2019), the Factory Festival (2019) and Open Art Shuffle street art festival (2021).
@miramar.muhd

Talal Al Najjar (b.1999) is an artist from the Emirates, based between Los Angeles and Dubai. Driven by collecting, archiving, and distorting, his interdisciplinary practice recontextualizes transhistorical material culture and imagery with an absurdist lens. Defamiliarization and the uncanny teeter and prompt new anthropological and material questions in his work. He produces sculpture, video, sound, CGI animation, painting, and installation, in addition to other media. Primary concerns include ideas around simulation, poor images, artefacts, counter-futurisms, and the contention of postmodern conditions. He received his MFA from ArtCenter College of Design (2023), and his BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2021). He has exhibited work in Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Chicago, and Los Angeles.@talalnajjar

Ziad Al Najjar (b.2001) approaches two and three-dimensional art with an aim to upturn fixed notions surrounding process, materiality, and visual perception. Establishing an interplay between organic and inorganic forms Al Najjar reflects upon the connectedness between the natural, constructed and spiritual realms and how they relate to his lived experience in the contemporary moment. Breaking from established conventions Al Najjar works upon an unstretched canvas, placing his focus on its material properties and releasing it from its flatness. Through his art, Al Najjar reimagines the canvas as a tapestry. @ziadnajjar_

ICD Brookfield Place Arts program creates community and opportunity through the transformative power of the arts. A vibrant and open space, we seek to engage and welcome everyone, inside and outside our walls, with the belief that having arts and culture in daily life positively impacts wellbeing. @ICDBrookfieldPlace

Tabari ArtSpace has played a central role in connecting international audiences to the modern and contemporary artists of the MENA region and its diaspora for the last two decades. Advanced by an all-women team, Tabari Artspace foregrounds marginalised perspectives and lesser-known narratives in contemporary art. @TabariArtSpace

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